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Altogether now...

ITS ALL ABOUT THE MONEY!!!!

They just cannot help themselves can they?

(especially when putting their hands in the till)
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General No To Mob Discussion / Re: Proof that ANPR cameras in car parks don't work
« Last post by Web Admin on 12 August, 2019, 08:38:36 AM »
#148
Family fined despite never parking at notorious Plymouth car park

Britannia Parking fined the Fell family £100 for queuing in a car park - the company has since decided to drop the matter altogether


Happy family - Hannah and Andrew Fell with their six-year-old daughter Olivia

A couple were left in disbelief after they were fined £100 by a private parking firm - for spending too long queuing for a space in a car park.

Hannah and Andrew Fell thought it would be a lovely idea to take their six-year-old daughter Olivia to the National Marine Aquarium during their summer break away in the South West.

They drove up from their holiday cottage in Padstow, Cornwall, and thought it'd be a good idea to drop their BMW 3 Series off in Plymouth's multi-storey Harbour Car Park.

But that's when their ordeal began.

"We started queuing as we went through the door - there weren't any signs to say it was full or that there weren't any spaces available," Hannah, 42, said.


The Fell family failed to find a space in the Britannia Parking operated car park - yet still received a fine

"We went all the way up to the top of the car park, and at that point I threw my husband and daughter out, saying head on over to the aquarium whilst I try to find a space.

"It was another 20 minutes that went by before I managed to get back down again because the queue was so big."


 
Flustered, Hannah managed to get out and find a space at Drake Circus' car park before walking all the way back up to the aquarium to meet her family.

Hannah says she was then left in total disbelief after a £100 fine courtesy of Britannia Parking dropped through the door back home in Cambridgeshire.


Olivia thankfully still managed to enjoy a trip to the aquarium - whilst her mum tried to park the car (Image: Hannah Fell)

The firm said its cameras had clocked them travelling in at 11.50am on July 30 and leaving at 12.23pm - having not paid for a ticket.

But Hannah says she never found a space so the fine seems ridiculous.

She said she was inspired to speak out after Catherine Lovell revealed she too had been fined by Britannia Parking after failing to find a parking space at the Harbour Car Park.

The company stood by its decision to fine Ms Lovell because she had spent 50 minutes in a queue.

"I never stepped foot out of my car to park," Hannah said. "I was impacted in that I couldn't actually leave.

"I was stuck in traffic, worming my way out after I had reached the top just like everybody else, we were all trying to get out."

Hannah said she and her husband have desperately tried to appeal the fine issued to them in the post on August 9.

She said the reference number wasn't recognised online and staff weren't taking her calls.

But now it's emerged the fine isn't actually valid anymore.

Britannia Parking told Plymouth Live it has decided to cancel the Fell family's penalty charge notice after carrying out an investigation into the circumstances. But the Fell family said they had not been told until contacted by Plymouth Live.

All of our signs and procedures meet the industry’s Approved Operators Code of Conduct, including those at the Harbour Car Park in Plymouth.

“We are a reputable car park operator and manager of more than 25 years’ standing, and a member of the British Parking Association.”

https://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/plymouth-news/family-fined-despite-never-parking-3192659
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Met Police prepares for huge increase in speed enforcement

The Metropolitan Police is preparing to launch a huge programme of speed limit enforcement across London, which aims to catch a million offenders a year.

Councillors on borough association London Councils’ transport and environment committee heard about the proposal last week. Transport manager Andrew Luck told them of a “planned increase in speed enforcement activity, which will result in an increase in the number of offences processed from 160,000 to one million per annum”.

“This will be delivered through an increase in safety camera enforcement activity as well as an increase in on-street activity and mobile speed enforcement equipment,” he said. LTT reported in March that Transport for London is working with partners on new criteria that will make more sites eligible for speed cameras (LTT 29 Mar).   

London boroughs and Transport for London have been pressing the police for more speed limit enforcement as part of efforts to cut road casualties. The increased number of 20mph speed limits on London’s main roads has raised awareness about the lack of enforcement.

LTT asked the Metropolitan Police about its plans but did not hear back by close of press.

AA president Edmund King questioned the apparent decision of the police to set a target for how many drivers to catch. “A reduction in traffic police and personnel involved in camera enforcement has led to a dip in the number of speeding tickets,” he said. “However, the enforcement regime should be based on road safety criteria rather than absolute numbers.”

King nevertheless pointed out that “more than 70 per cent of drivers accept the use of cameras and more than 80 per cent who have been on a speed awareness course would recommend it”.

Roger Lawson, campaign director for the Alliance of British Drivers, said: “Is there any real justification for this when speeding is one of the least important factors in road traffic accidents  (about 5 per cent)?

“This is surely more about the police having learned they can make money by offering speed awareness courses.” The ABD doubts the legality of drivers being given the course option.

London Councils and TfL are continuing to explore opportunities to decriminalise speed limit enforcement. Luck said both organisations had received legal advice that “currently there is no legislative basis for the decriminalisation and any existing powers that could enable boroughs to prosecute criminal cases are limited and untested”.

“Legal advice also indicates that there is no legislative basis for boroughs to offer, or to raise revenue from, diversionary/awareness courses.”

London Councils is exploring the changes needed for full or partial decriminalisation. “This will include an exploration to determine whether it is possible to retain dual criminal and decriminalised regimes to allow for borough enforcement of minor contraventions, for example, and the police to retain the power to prosecute the more serious offences,” said Luck. “This will also examine the possible role in authorities running speed awareness courses.”

Minutes of a recent meeting of borough officers, TfL and the Metropolitan Police, state:  “There was little vocal support for the full decriminalisation of speed enforcement. However, some attendees were keen to consider how local authorities could support the police within the scope of existing legislation.”

Luck said the ongoing work would consider possibly different approaches between enforcement on the Transport for London Road Network and borough roads, and also “the implications of a borough choosing not to take up a potential future option to enforce speeding and whether the police would retain responsibility in this circumstance”.

London Councils is keen to trial decriminalised enforcement without changing legislation, or run an evidence-gathering trial without enforcement taking place.

The London Borough of Wandsworth is interested in a trial. A report to the council’s executive next week states: “Soft trial of 20mph enforcement cameras on residential roads under discussion with the police and TfL, with a view to an autumn 2019 pilot, which would necessitate greater delegation of powers to the local authority.”


https://www.transportxtra.com/publications/local-transport-today/news/61450/met-police-prepares-for-huge-increase-in-spee
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Revealed: The UK roads where drivers are most likely to get fined for parking and breaching traffic rules as figures show councils make £200,000 an HOUR

UK motorists were hit with £1.6billion in fines by local authorities last year
Most expensive street in London was Bank Junction which raked in almost £11m
Brighton and Hove council's Western Road was the priciest outside of the capital


British drivers are being hit with thousands of fines for breaching the rules of the road and parking regulations, making council's as much as £200,000 an hour.

New figures revealed after Freedom of Information requests have shown where the most likely places across the UK are to be hit with a ticket.

Over all last year motorists were given £1.6billion in fines by local authorities, the equal to £200,000 an hour, reports the Daily Express. 

Of the total, a quarter were in parking fines while the rest of the charges included driving in bus lanes or time restrictions on roads.

The Alliance of British Drivers have slammed councils for 'milking motorists' and said it is 'undoubtedly the case that councils are using parking fines' to generate money.


Western Road in Brighton and Hove (pictured bottom middle) was the most expensive street outside of London, earning the council £205,790 in fines last year

Outside of London, Brighton and Hove council's Western Road was the priciest making £205,790 after issuing 7,628 tickets.

The next most expensive street was High Street in Slough which made £123,387 from 5,400 tickets.

Bank Junction, which is in the City of London, was the most expensive street within the capital last year managing to rake in £10,841.581 in fines.

While drivers using the busy junction where nine streets converge in the financial centre of London were issued 175,600 tickets.

Several dangerous accidents have occurred at Bank Junction in previous years, including the death of 26-year-old cyclist Ying Tao in June 2015.

She was 'sucked under' the wheels of a 32-tonne tipper truck which only indicated as the lights changed.


Bank Junction in London, pictured, was the most expensive street within the capital last year managing to rake in £10,841.581 in fines

Strategy consultant Mrs Tao, originally from Nanjing, China, had married her husband Jin Chuan Zhou just 13 months before the crash.

In response to the high frequency of collisions at the busy junction the 'Bank on Safety' experimental traffic scheme was started.

The City of London Corporation said there had been a 52 per cent reduction in casualties after a 12-month trial, reports the BBC.

Since September 2018 this has become permanent and means only buses and pedal cycles are able to cross the Junction between 7am to 7pm Monday to Friday.

If a vehicle crosses the junction they will be spotted on CCTV and given a fine, which costs £65 if paid in 14 days.


In London Station Road in Harrow and Horns Road in Redbridge made the top ten (pictured on map) with them both making more than £550,000 last year

Shakespeare Street in Newcastle and Prescot Street in Liverpool also made the top of expensive roads, each raking in more than £100,000 last year.

In London Station Road in Harrow and Horns Road in Redbridge made the top ten with them both making more than £550,000 last year and issuing less than 10,000 tickets.

Roger Lawson of the Alliance of British Drivers told MailOnline: 'It is undoubtedly the case that councils are using parking fines and 'moving traffic offences' to generate money.

In London Station Road in Harrow and Horns Road in Redbridge made the top ten (pictured on map) with them both making more than £550,000 last year

Shakespeare Street in Newcastle and Prescot Street in Liverpool also made the top of expensive roads, each raking in more than £100,000 last year.

In London Station Road in Harrow and Horns Road in Redbridge made the top ten with them both making more than £550,000 last year and issuing less than 10,000 tickets.

Roger Lawson of the Alliance of British Drivers told MailOnline: 'It is undoubtedly the case that councils are using parking fines and 'moving traffic offences' to generate money.

'This is often from motorists who have made accidental mistakes, do not understand or have not seen the signage.





'Bank junction in the City is a classic example of a scheme deliberately designed to trap and fine innocent drivers. But road closures, bus lanes and over-complex parking schemes are other examples.

'Councils are desperate to raise money and are milking motorists as a result. Often they are breaching the law by using parking charges and associated penalty charges as a way to raise revenue.'

In 2017 it was revealed that 12million penalty notices are handed out annually – the equivalent of one every 2.5 seconds.

It also showed fines for using bus lanes had risen four-fold to 1.4million over the last decade, as councils across the country have deployed cameras to catch out drivers.

Tory MP Charlie Elphicke said at the time: 'This is yet more evidence of how local councils are using motorists as cash cows to plug gaps in their own finances.

'It's high time that they stopped using fines to fleece motorists.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7319191/UK-roads-drivers-likely-fined-figures-councils-make-200-000-HOUR.html
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Bus lanes are enforceable all over England because they are controlled under separate legislation (The Bus Lane Contraventions (Penalty Charges, Adjudication and Enforcement) (England) Regulations 2005).

Scotland, Ireland and Wales have their own equivalent legislation governing enforcement.

Thanks; there had to be a catch! I have managed to avoid copping a fine on my regular visits there but most of the guys in the factory have been clobbered by the one near the main Newcastle station, it HAS to be entrapment the layout is so appalling...

As lorrise over 3.5 tonnes are ok and will almost certainly obscure your view of the signs in a car following it is easy to get suckered in!

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@54.9691963,-1.617315,3a,53.6y,244.52h,83.91t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sTv4rCOnYGBJ2ziWprF575Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en&authuser=0
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Bus lanes are enforceable all over England because they are controlled under separate legislation (The Bus Lane Contraventions (Penalty Charges, Adjudication and Enforcement) (England) Regulations 2005).

Scotland, Ireland and Wales have their own equivalent legislation governing enforcement.
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Well that is a glimmer of light...

So how are Newcastle-upon-Tyne enforcing ridiculous bus lanes????
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DfT rejects moving traffic offence plea

19 July 2019
 
The DfT has once again ruled out local authority requests for moving traffic offences outside London to be decriminalised. Local authorities in Greater Manchester requested the power as part of their clean air plan proposals. But environment minister Thérèse Coffey told them this week: “My officials have discussed with the Department for Transport, and there are no current plans to enable local authorities outside London to enforce moving traffic offences. These offences...

https://www.transportxtra.com/publications/local-transport-today/news/61715/dft-rejects-moving-traffic-offence-plea
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#147

As usual, the camera alone cannot tell whether a vehicle is parked in contravention of terms and conditions.

=====================================


Shell fined me for being in its forecourt waiting for a car wash

I paid for the car wash and then had to queue for my turn. Absurdly I received a £60 fine for overstaying


Using a car wash came with a hefty fine from Shell.

I drove into a Shell garage in Kilburn (north-west London) to use the automatic car wash. I paid £5, and there were five or six cars in front and two behind me. It took ages – probably about an hour.

I have since received a £60 fine (rising to £100 if not paid within a set time) from Euro Car Parks saying I overstayed its maximum 20-minute waiting time. It rejected my appeal stating that the signs say clearly there is a maximum wait time. This is frankly absurd. Shell is selling this car wash and yet not using discretion about the fact that a line of cars will easily lead to overstaying this 20-minute period.

I don’t intend to pay the fine and have appealed, but surely Shell has to account for people waiting to use a service it has sold. SR, London


We got in touch with Shell which claimed it had not received a direct complaint from you. It said the format does not involve a strict queueing system but is a forecourt “where customers tend to park their cars and go into nearby shops. This is why there is a notice at the site that informs site visitors and car wash users to input their details into a car wash console, so that the waiting time registers as waiting for the car wash service. Unfortunately, there is no record on our side of [SR’s] details being input into the console, which is why the fine notice was sent.”

You appealed to Euro Car Parks, which refused to overturn the decision, but then you went further to Popla (the independent appeals service for parking charge notices issued on private land) and recently learned that your appeal was successful. Euro Car Parks did not respond to our request for an explanation. Your case seems to raise interesting questions. We’d be interested to hear if other readers have had similar problems.

We welcome letters but cannot answer individually. Email us at consumer.champions@theguardian.com or write to Consumer Champions, Money, the Guardian, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU. Please include a daytime phone number. Submission and publication of all letters is subject to terms and conditions

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/jul/08/shell-fined-me-for-being-in-its-forecourt-waiting-for-a-car-wash
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"London Councils and TfL are continuing to explore opportunities to decriminalise speed limit enforcement."

All together now....

ITS ALL ABOUT THE MONEY!!!!

 ::))) ::))) ::))) ::))) ::))) ::)))

Cash cow green light right there!
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