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NHS workers will have to pay for parking at hospitals again as Government set to withdraw extra funding after coronavirus crisis

Exclusive: Trade unions are pushing for ministers to extend the free parking scheme for hospital employees

By Hugo Gye
July 7, 2020 9:00 pm
Updated July 7, 2020 8:56 pm

NHS workers will have to start paying for parking at their own hospitals again as the Covid-19 crisis starts to ease, the Government has confirmed.

Doctors, nurses, carers and support staff in England have been allowed to park at their workplace for free since the start of lockdown thanks to funding from the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC).

But ministers have now confirmed they intend to reintroduce charges because the emergency measures “cannot continue indefinitely” – prompting a backlash from trade unions who want to see free parking for staff made permanent.

Around the height of the Covid-19 emergency in March, the department said it would provide funding to all NHS trusts to enable them to abolish parking charges for their staff without having to cut their budgets, while also encouraging workers to drive rather than risk taking public transport.

‘Provide clarity’


NHS staff and members of the public take part in the weekly Clap for Our Carers event at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in May

Health minister Edward Argar said: “The provision of free parking for National Health Service staff by NHS trusts has not ended and nothing has changed since the announcement on 25 March. However, free parking for staff has only been made possible by support from local authorities and independent providers and this support cannot continue indefinitely.”

Some hospitals in England charge as much as £3.50 per hour for the use of their car parks, including for staff and patients. There are no parking fees at Welsh hospitals or at most Scottish institutions.

Liberal Democrat MP Layla Moran said: “Removing parking charges for staff during Covid-19 was the right move. Our healthcare workers deserved to have certainty that they could get to work without extra charges or hassle. Now the Government must provide clarity and ensure our workers are not saddled with extortionate parking charges.”

Sara Gorton of Unison, which represents nearly 500,000 NHS employees, said: “Nurses, cleaners and other health workers shouldn’t be punished for simply parking at work so they can save lives and care for patients. The virus problems are far from going away and when this is over, the Government should fund trusts properly so they can scrap staff charges for good.” She added that keeping staff off public transport helped reduce the risk of spreading infection.

A spokesperson for DHSC would not give a date for the reintroduction of parking charges but said: “We want to make sure NHS staff can travel safely to work during the pandemic, which is why we requested that the NHS make parking free for staff, and that local authorities do the same with their car parks.

“As the pandemic begins to ease, the NHS will continue to provide free hospital car parking to key patient groups and NHS staff in certain circumstances. We will provide further updates on this in due course.”

Plans to make parking permanently free for night-shift workers, disabled patients and the parents of ill children – originally due to start in April – will not come fully into effect until January 2021. Hospitals are being encouraged to enact the scheme, promised in the Conservative election manifesto, already but they are not obliged to do so until the end of the year.

A&E parking — The highest prices

Some of the most expensive daily parking rates for A&E at hospitals in England

Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London — £77
Whittington Health NHS Trust, London — £72
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London — £52.80
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London – £40
King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London — £29
St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London — £25
Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Sussex — £20
Luton and Dunstable University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Bedfordshire — £20
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Hampshire — £18.20
 Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Sussex — £18
Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust, Surrey — £17
East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust, East Sussex — £16.60
Leeds General Infirmary, West Yorkshire — £16.40
St James’s University Hospital, West Yorkshire — £16.40
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital King’s Lynn NHS Foundation Trust, Norfolk — £15.60
(Prices date from August 2019)

https://inews.co.uk/news/politics/nhs-workers-pay-parking-hospitals-explained-coronavirus-crisis-498590
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Don't go to drive through takeaways. Go home and cook a proper meal!
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#168

KFC customers receive £100 parking fines after queuing at drive-through for too long

17 June 2020


Hungry KFC fans queuing up at a Wirral drive-through for their favourite takeaway

KFC customers were shocked after they received £100 parking fines for waiting too long at a drive-through.

The unsuspecting chicken lovers did not realise they were queuing in a privately owned car park in Wirral, Merseyside, to buy their meals.

The parking charge notices were issued to people who waited longer than the 75 minutes permitted at the reopened takeaway in Rock Ferry.

This was despite long queues that left people with waiting times of more than two hours.


Customers were shocked to be hit with £100 parking fines for waiting too long in the privately-owned car park

Even though none of the customers were in parking bays, they were automatically hit with fines because their registrations were caught on CCTV when they entered and left the KFC site.

The first people knew about it was when a letter landed on their doormat from private car park operator Civil Enforcement a few days later, ordering them to pay a £100 parking charge – reduced to £60 if paid within 14 days.

Read more: Crocs launches a KFC shoe that looks and smells like fried chicken

Mum-of-two Hayley Abbott, who was waiting in the KFC queue for 90 minutes, said it was “the most expensive KFC I've ever had in my life”.


KFC has cancelled the fines.

Abbot added: “There was a security guard bringing people into the car park and there was no mention of there being a time limit and a possible fine.

“Once you're in the queue, you can't get out of it. The cars were bumper to bumper.

“I was fuming when I got the parking ticket through the post a few days later. I was thinking, ‘this is the most expensive KFC I've ever had in my life.’”

Read more: Surprise reopening of KFC causes 'two-hour queues' and 'manic scenes'

Instead of paying the fine, Abbot challenged it – and her appeal was upheld.

Another victim of the fines, who gave her name as Alisha, said: “It wasn't my fault I was waiting in a queue.

“If KFC knew people were going to be fined, they shouldn't have let that many people in.”

There was also a strong response when news of the fines was posted on a Facebook group's page, with many others saying they had had the same experience and were refusing to pay.

After being inundated with complaints from angry customers, KFC said it had now cancelled the penalty notices.

A KFC spokesperson said: "It's great to be back and we're flattered by how much our Rock Ferry fans have missed us!

"Our longer than usual queues did result in a few unfair fines for the car park but we've put that right now by cancelling the charges."

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/kfc-drive-through-parking-fines-merseyside-110742018.html
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General No To Mob Discussion / Re: Information Commissioner and DVLA prepare for war
« Last post by acer on 27 June, 2020, 03:10:08 PM »
I did ask ICO for copy of legal advice, it refused.

But that was several months ago.

If you ask again they simply refuse as 'vexatious'.






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1. I dont (sic) have a copy but I have seen the exemption claimed is s.42(1) which is LPP.

Have you checked on Whatdotheyknow?

2. Anyone who is effected (sic) can apply for JR but the first port of call might be the PHSO.

What you seem to be suggesting is that someone could apply for a judicial review of the ICO's decision not to enforce the terms of the Data Protection Act, and that the decision not to enforce was made pursuant to some legal advice (see below) that only the DVLA have had sight of. Or have I got hold of the wrong end of the stick?

3. You misunderstand the process. Read the DPA
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2018/12/part/6/crossheading/enforcement-notices/2018-05-23

See 2 above

If the DVLA refuses to comply then they can appeal to the F-tT.
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2018/12/section/162/2018-05-23

I suggest you email to the ICO and print the reply (may take a while)

"Dear ICO,

Are you investigating the DVLA for failure to comply with Data Protection Act 98/18 and GDPR as regards vehicle keeper data held on the DVLA register of vehicles?

This would suggest that we don't know if an investigation is underway.

What date did the investigation start?

So first we should ask if an investigation has been/is being undertaken, but now we are assuming it has already started? Doesn't make sense.

Does the investigation involve the (alleged) failure of the DVLA to check every application for reasonable cause for wanting data before releasing keeper details to private parking firms?

?

Have you taken legal advice regarding the investigation, please supply s (sic) copy under FOIA?

And here we get to the crux of why you want someone else to do your dirty work. Please explain what is stopping you from asking for the legal advice via FoI? I do hope you are not trying to make us complicit in some kind of vexatious FoI campaign.

And before answering my last question you should be aware that I am quite adept at searching Whatdotheyknow FoI requests, and having already done so I am fairly confident the question is rhetorical.



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General No To Mob Discussion / Re: Information Commissioner and DVLA prepare for war
« Last post by acer on 25 June, 2020, 12:25:29 AM »
1. I dont have a copy but I have seen the exemption claimed is s.42(1) which is LPP.

2. Anyone who is effected can apply for JR but the first port of call might be the PHSO.

3. You misunderstand the process. Read the DPA
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2018/12/part/6/crossheading/enforcement-notices/2018-05-23

If the DVLA refuses to comply then they can appeal to the F-tT.
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2018/12/section/162/2018-05-23

I suggest you email to the ICO and print the reply (may take a while)

"Dear ICO,

Are you investigating the DVLA for failure to comply with Data Protection Act 98/18 and GDPR as regards vehicle keeper data held on the DVLA register of vehicles?

What date did the investigation start?

Does the investigation involve the (alleged) failure of the DVLA to check every application for reasonable cause for wanting data before releasing keeper details to private parking firms?

Have you taken legal advice regarding the investigation, please supply s copy under FOIA?
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1. DVLA has admitted in a FOIA request that it has taken legal advice but wont release it.

Please provide a link to the FOIA request

2. The ICO is under a statutory duty to uphold parts 3 and 4 of the DPA18, failure to issue an enforcement notice would be a breach of statutory duty (and leaves them vulnerable to JR).

Who will be asking for a Judicial Review if it gets to that stage?

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2018/12/schedule/13/2018-05-23
(1)The Commissioner must—
(a)monitor and enforce Parts 3 and 4 of this Act;


35The first data protection principle
(1)The first data protection principle is that the processing of personal data for any of the law enforcement purposes must be lawful and fair.

3. The enforcement notice has not been served yet, the ICO is refusing to say if has been drafted.

Please provide a link to the decision that requires an enforcement notice.

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General No To Mob Discussion / Re: Information Commissioner and DVLA prepare for war
« Last post by acer on 24 June, 2020, 08:17:07 AM »
1. DVLA has admitted in a FOIA request that it has taken legal advice but wont release it.

2. The ICO is under a statutory duty to uphold parts 3 and 4 of the DPA18, failure to issue an enforcement notice would be a breach of statutory duty (and leaves them vulnerable to JR).

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2018/12/schedule/13/2018-05-23
(1)The Commissioner must—
(a)monitor and enforce Parts 3 and 4 of this Act;


35The first data protection principle
(1)The first data protection principle is that the processing of personal data for any of the law enforcement purposes must be lawful and fair.

3. The enforcement notice has not been served yet, the ICO is refusing to say if has been drafted.




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This can be appealed to the Tribunal.

If this can be appealed to the Tribunal it would mean the ICO would have reached a decision regarding a complaint that can be appealed. The ICO normally publish such decisions. Please tell us where we can find and review said decision. Thanks.
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It is known that DVLA has taken legal advice (but refuses to release this to the public).

Who is it that knows? How do you know?
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